Allie Gardner

CPB report to Congress on alternative funding finds no viable substitute for federal support -Current.org →

shaneguiter:

If Congress were to zero-out federal appropriations to public broadcasting, 54 public television stations in 19 states and 76 pubradio stations in 38 states would be at “high risk” of shutting down,  CPB reported in  “Alternative Sources of Funding for Public Broadcasting Stations,” a comprehensive revenue analysis produced by Booz & Company and delivered to Capitol Hill today (June 20).

Lawmakers requested the research paper in December 2011 when they approved CPB’s fiscal 2014 advance appropriation for $445 million.

The report identifies five new or alternative funding options for public media — TV advertising, radio advertising, retransmission consent fees, paid digital subscriptions and digital game publishing — but says none of these offer “a realistic opportunity to generate significant positive net revenue that could replace the current amount of federal funding that CPB receives.”


kqedscience:

And now, a dolphin with an octopus stuck to its naughty bits

“While observing bottlenoses last week off of the Greek island of Kalamos, biologist Joan Gonzalvo of the Ionian Dolphin Project photographed this, ahem, unique shot of a dolphin receiving the tender touch of cephalopod. Explains Gonzalvo of this unintentional chimera: One of the individuals of the group surprised us leaping out of the water with an unexpected guest attached to its belly (right on top of its genital slit!) […] After this high leap, presumably executed to get rid of this intrusive octopus, the dolphin continued to swim with the other three members of its group without manifesting any signs of distress […]”


Full si

kqedscience:

And now, a dolphin with an octopus stuck to its naughty bits


While observing bottlenoses last week off of the Greek island of Kalamos, biologist Joan Gonzalvo of the Ionian Dolphin Project photographed this, ahem, unique shot of a dolphin receiving the tender touch of cephalopod. Explains Gonzalvo of this unintentional chimera: One of the individuals of the group surprised us leaping out of the water with an unexpected guest attached to its belly (right on top of its genital slit!) […] After this high leap, presumably executed to get rid of this intrusive octopus, the dolphin continued to swim with the other three members of its group without manifesting any signs of distress […]”